Continuous Monitors

Dexcom

Updated for Dexcom Share FDA approval DexCom, headquartered in San Diego, California, is focused on developing technology for continuous glucose monitoring to improve the lives of people with diabetes. Their DexCom STS system was approved by the FDA on March 27, 2006. Since then, Dexcom has upgraded their system to the new Dexcom G4 Platinum. In February of 2014, the FDA approved a pediatric version of the G4 for children ages 2-17. The sensors may be placed in the upper buttocks or abdomen for children but parents are cautioned to not depend solely on the CGM for readings.

CGMs: Looking Beyond the Numbers

A few years ago, when real-time continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) were introduced, my opinion was less than enthusiastic. I kept going back to the issue of accuracy. If blood glucose meters are within 15% of lab values, and CGMs are within about 15% of the meters, how useful could they possibly be? In my personal experience, I have seen plenty of CGM inaccuracies. And a day does not go by without a call or e-mail from a concerned client doubting the usefulness of their CGM system.

Comparison of Current Continuous Glucose Monitors (CGMs)

A continuous glucose monitor, also called CGMs, reveals short-term trends in the blood sugar as they happen. You can see the direction your blood sugar is taking in the last 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, or 24 hours, depending on what times the monitor offers. Various companies have already released continuous monitors, with more companies developing theirs every day.

Continuous Glucose Monitors

A continuous glucose monitor reveals short-term trends in the blood sugar as they happen. The monitor reads out a constant stream of glucose data every 1 to 5 minutes. You can see the direction your blood sugar is taking in the last 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, or 24 hours, depending on what times your specific monitor offers. This gives 288 to 1440 readings a day compared to the 4 to 8 fingerstick readings you rely on with a meter.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Continuous Monitors