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Dexcom

DexCom, Inc. is a leader in continuous glucose sensing technologies, and focuses 100% on these technologies. Founded in 1999, DexCom’s roots stem from the pioneering 1967 research on implanted glucose sensors at the University of Wisconsin. DexCom started with a focus on creating an implantable Sensor that the body would not reject and that would perform for a long period of time

Roche and Dexcom Partner Up

Dexcom is making more friends. Already having partnerships with Animas and Omnipod, Dexcom has now signed a research and development agreement with Roche Diagnostics U.S. The plan is to integrate Dexcom's continuous glucose monitor into Roche's insulin pumps so you can see trends and blood glucose data in one handheld device.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Head to Head Comparison

The Dexcom STS and the Paradigm RT continuous monitors are currently available in the U.S. with a prescription. In this study, they are compared head to head while being worn by one person with Type 1 diabetes. Over 33 days, 262 simultaneous readings were compared between a One Touch meter and the two continuous monitors. The meter was used to calibrate both monitors and as the standard against which their accuracy was evaluated.

Dexcom

Updated for Dexcom Share FDA approval DexCom, headquartered in San Diego, California, is focused on developing technology for continuous glucose monitoring to improve the lives of people with diabetes. Their DexCom STS system was approved by the FDA on March 27, 2006. Since then, Dexcom has upgraded their system to the new Dexcom G4 Platinum. In February of 2014, the FDA approved a pediatric version of the G4 for children ages 2-17. The sensors may be placed in the upper buttocks or abdomen for children but parents are cautioned to not depend solely on the CGM for readings.

Comparison of Current Continuous Glucose Monitors (CGMs)

A continuous glucose monitor, also called CGMs, reveals short-term trends in the blood sugar as they happen. You can see the direction your blood sugar is taking in the last 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, or 24 hours, depending on what times the monitor offers. Various companies have already released continuous monitors, with more companies developing theirs every day.

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